Event Library



Manipulating Atoms with Lasers

Lecture presented by: Claude Cohen-Tannoudji
Date: December 8, 2016
Location: Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic

Light is an essential source of information on the world around us, not only at the microscopic scale of atoms and molecules, but also at the very large scale of the universe. It appears now that light

Mapping the Universe and It’s History

Lecture presented by: Prof. George Smoot
Date: November 9, 2016
Location: Beihang University, Beijing, China

Observations of the universe, along with careful analysis and computer modeling, have allowed us to determine what happened over billions of years with amazing certainty and accuracy.

Discovering Radio Noise from the Big Bang

Robert Woodrow Wilson
Lecture presented by: Dr. Robert Wilson
Date: October 24, 2016
Location: Universitatea Politehnica Timișoara, Romania

Dr. Wilson tells the story of how he and Dr. Arno Penzias discovered Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at Bell Laboratories about 50 years ago.

New Forms of Matter Near Absolute Zero Temperature

Lecture presented by: Prof. Wolfgang Ketterle
Date: February 24, 2016
Location: Cety's University, Mexicali, Mexico

Why do physicists freeze matter to extremely low temperatures?  Why is it worthwhile to cool to temperatures which are a billion times lower than that of interstellar space?

Stone Cold Science: Bose-Einstein Condensation and the Weird World of Physics a Millionth of a Degree above Absolute Zero

Lecture presented by: Prof Eric Cornell
Date: November 10, 2015
Location: Universitatea Politehnica Bucuresti, Romania

How does one reach the necessary record-low temperatures, and why does a scientist go to all the trouble to make a new and bizarre state of matter?

Are We Really Made of Quarks?

Lecture presented by: Professor Jerome I. Friedman
Date: October 20, 2015
Location: VŠB–Technical University of Ostrava, Czech Republic

The answer to the question, “Are we really made of quarks?”, is yes; but physicists did not arrive at this answer easily. The quark model, which embodied a radically new conceptual view of the structure of matter,

Mapping the Universe and Its History

Lecture presented by: Prof. George Smoot
Date: May 21, 2015
Location: Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexicali, Mexico

Observations of the universe, along with careful analysis and computer modeling, have allowed us to determine what happened over billions of years with amazing certainty and accuracy.

New Forms of Matter Near Absolute Zero Temperature

Lecture presented by: Prof. Wolfgang Ketterle
Date: November 4, 2014
Location: Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an, China

Why do physicists freeze matter to extremely low temperatures?  Why is it worthwhile to cool to temperatures which are a billion times lower than that of interstellar space?  In this talk, I will discuss new forms of

Discovering Radio Noise from the Big Bang

Robert Woodrow Wilson
Lecture presented by: Dr. Robert Wilson
Date: October 4, 2014
Location: Czech Technical University, Prague

In this talk, I will tell the story of how Arno Penzias and I discovered Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at Bell Laboratories about 50 years ago. I will start with a brief discussion of cosmology in the

Manipulating Atoms with Lasers

Lecture presented by: Claude Cohen-Tannoudji
Date: April 7, 2014
Location: VIT University

Light is an essential source of information on the world around us, not only at the microscopic scale of atoms and molecules, but also at the very large scale of the universe. It appears now that light

Stone Cold Science: Bose-Einstein Condensation and the Weird World of Physics a Millionth of a Degree above Absolute Zero

Lecture presented by: Prof Eric Cornell
Date: February 19, 2014
Location: CETYS University, Mexicali, Mexico

How does one reach the necessary record-low temperatures, and why does a scientist go to all the trouble to make a new and bizarre state of matter?

The Conception of the CCD

Lecture presented by: Dr. George Smith
Date: December 3, 2013
Location: Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic

Since nothing is invented in a vacuum, a short history of integrated circuit technology relevant to the Charge-Coupled Device will be given.

Does Science Evolve through Blind Chance or Intelligent Design?

Lecture presented by: Professor Sheldon Glashow
Date: November 15, 2013
Location: Beihang University, Beijing, China

Some scientific advances, such as X-rays and penicillin, arise unplanned and unexpected. They are stumbled upon serendipitously.

A Century of Quantum Mechanics

Lecture presented by: Professor David Gross
Date: August 27, 2013
Location: College of Engineering, Pune

Quantum Mechanics is approximately one hundred years old and has proven to be the most successful theoretical framework in the history of physics.

Spintronics: A New Frontier for Computing and Communications

Lecture presented by: Professor Albert Fert
Date: March 27, 2013
Location: VŠB–Technical University of Ostrava, Czech Republic

Spin Electronics – or Spintronics – is a new field of research which exploits the influence of the orientation of the electron spin* on the electrical conduction in magnetic materials. It is mainly known for the “giant magnetoresistance” (GMR) of the magnetic multilayers, a phenomenon that is used to read the hard disc of our computer and has led to a large increase of the capacity of the discs.

Are We Really Made of Quarks?

Lecture presented by: Professor Jerome I. Friedman
Date: March 2, 2013
Location: Universidad Autonoma de Baja California (UABC), Mexicali, Mexico

The answer to the question, “Are we really made of quarks?, is yes; but physicists did not arrive at this answer easily. The quark model, which embodied a radically new conceptual view of the structure of matter, was fiercely debated and generally rejected by the physics community. Its ultimate acceptance took well over a decade and occurred only after inescapable and compelling experimental evidence was obtained.

The Revolution of Personalized Medicine – Are We Going to Cure All Diseases and at What Price?

Lecture presented by: Professor Aaron Ciechanover
Date: November 30, 2012
Location: Birla Institute of Technology & Science, in Pilani, India

Many important drugs such as penicillin, aspirin, or digitalis, were discovered by serendipity – some by curious researchers who accidentally noted a “strange” phenomenon, and some by isolation of active ingredients form plants known for centuries to have a specific therapeutic effect.

How Advances in Science are Made

Lecture presented by: Professor Douglas Osheroff
Date: November 10, 2012
Location: Manipal Institute of Technology, in Manipal, India

How advances in science are made, and how they may come to benefit mankind at large are complex issues. The discoveries that most influence the way we think about nature seldom can be anticipated, and frequently the applications for new technologies developed to probe a specific characteristic of nature are also seldom clear, even to the inventors of these technologies.

Passion for Precision

Lecture presented by: Professor Theodor Hansch
Date: October 26, 2012
Location: Shanghai Jiao Tong University in Shanghai, China

Some of the most fundamental insights in physics, such as the relativity of space and time, have been gained by increasing the precision of experimental measurements. The Balmer spectrum of atomic hydrogen has provided the Rosetta stone for deciphering the strange laws of quantum physics during the early 20th century.

Does Science Evolve through Blind Chance or Intelligent Design?

Lecture presented by: Professor Sheldon Glashow
Date: May 10, 2012
Location: Czech Technical University, Prague

Some scientific advances, such as X-rays and penicillin, arise unplanned and unexpected. They are stumbled upon serendipitously. Others, such as streptomycin and nuclear reactors, result from targeted research. They come about through careful design in what Professor Glashow calls the Kantian mode.

Laser Manipulation of Atoms

Lecture presented by: Claude Cohen-Tannoudji
Date: November 15, 2011
Location: BUAA University – Beijing, China

Light is an essential source of information on the world around us, not only at the microscopic scale of atoms and molecules, but also at the very large scale of the universe. It appears now that light is also a powerful tool for acting on atoms, for manipulating them, for controlling their various degrees of freedom.

Respecting the Objectives of STEM Education

Lecture presented by: Dr. John L. Hall
Date: November 8, 2011
Location: CETYS University – Mexicali, Mexico

A century ago one could become trained in a field and pursue one’s thesis area for the length of the career. That world is long gone, and the lifetime of a cutting-edge engineering education may be just a few years. Characteristically, the new solutions increasingly need to be based on a broader range of knowledges.

How Advances in Science are Made

Lecture presented by: Professor Douglas Osheroff
Date: March 23, 2011
Location: Brno University of Technology, Brno, Czech Republic

In many cases, the chain of discoveries that lead us to a deeper understanding of the natural world is not always anticipated. Even technologies developed to investigate the mysteries of nature don’t always have an immediate application.